609.333.0653

How To Reduce Emotional Reactions During Conflict

man-742766_1280

It is often not the facts or figures which are the problem in conflict: it is the emotions. Depending on the personalities, situations, power-differentials, topic and skills of each party, conflict creates a wide range of personal emotional reactions.

Take the situation of a difference of opinion with your manager about your performance. The facts may be unclear if you met your manager’s expectations. Expectations are subjective and may not have been outlined specifically. Add to that, your… Read the full article >

To Schedule a Free Consultation, Click Here >

Why Leaders Are Often Lunatics

The new movie now headed to your local theater—Steve Jobs—sets out to make the point that the man who created arguably the greatest company in the world was slightly off his rocker. Or perhaps he was a nasty, crazy man in disguise.

Rather than indulging in that pointless debate, let’s step back and look at a broader and more meaningful issue: virtually all great leaders are in fact lunatics in part.

It is the very oddity of their thinking and personalities that lets them see and develop what passes the rest of us by. The fact is, I have… Read the full article >

To Schedule a Free Consultation, Click Here >

Why Miserable Leaders Claim they have a Horrible Team

A friend of mine told me that his friend, a top leader at a top company, actually said:  “I am great leader, but my team sucks.” We laughed hystertically!  It is so absurb.  Yet there are many leaders out there that think this.

Jim Collins’ extensive research in Good to Great tells us that great leaders of long term financially successful companies are the opposite of this leader.  They are humble.  They credit their success on how lucky they are to have such a great team working for them.

Yet I can empathize with this frustration of a leader who feels his team… Read the full article >

To Schedule a Free Consultation, Click Here >

When Leaders Must Cross The Toughness Line

With decades of talk about improving “emotional intelligence” (code for being nicer), and societies questioning gender roles–for men and women-the challenge for leaders is what is the toughness line and can they cross it?

One of the largest research studies on the traits of effective leaders, known as The Big Five, concludes that tough and even “abusive” leaders may be unavoidable and even desirable. The study identified Neuroticism (characterized by moodiness, jealousy and emotional reactivity) as one of the top traits of effective leaders. Abusiveness is a fuzzy line.  Some people perceive and cry abuse with leaders who use tough talk.  Others aren’t bothered… Read the full article >

To Schedule a Free Consultation, Click Here >

One Small Thing You Do that Makes Your Team Think You’re a Bully Boss

bully
Her team members were seen crying in the bathroom. They wrote a letter of demands, like hostages, to the VP of Human Resources. And she had no idea that she was the problem.

This was 20 years ago and the first time I was asked to tell a Bully Boss that enough was enough.

When I talked to her team, it turned out, as is often the case, that they liked her in general. But it was just one… Read the full article >

To Schedule a Free Consultation, Click Here >

Increase Your Team's Swing: Learn How >